Photo of Chalana Williams

Chalana Williams is an associate in the firm's Antitrust and Advertising & Product Risk Management groups. Chalana provides litigation and counseling services with a focus on consumer protection matters, as well as the substantiation and defense of advertising claims. She counsels clients on compliance with statutes and regulations enforced by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Federal Trade Commission. Chalana also has experience assisting both challengers and advertisers in disputes before the National Advertising Division (NAD). Her antitrust practice includes representing clients in inquiries by the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission, as well as representing clients seeking to recover damages in private antitrust litigation.

Consumers are winning in the digital age. And marketing teams are being forced to think outside of the box.

© Getty Images

According to a recent study, people would rather give up their spouse, or go to prison if it means they won’t lose their smartphone. On top of that, consumers are “cutting” or “shaving” the cord to traditional television and demanding more flexibility in how they view content. Nielsen data shows that between 2011 and 2017, traditional TV viewing by 18-24 year olds dropped by almost 12 hours a week, or by roughly 1 hour 40 minutes per day. In addition, online advertisers are employing targeted advertising whereby consumers are exposed to ads that reflect their interests. As a consequence, consumers are becoming increasingly difficult for marketers to reach and businesses are struggling to find ways to bridge this gap.


Continue Reading

Baker’s dozen = 13 (not 12)

Easy.

Foot = 12 inches (the length of the average man’s foot)

Of course. I learned this in the second grade.

2 by 4 = 1.5 inches by 3.5 inches  

What?

4 by 4 = 3 ½ inches by 3 ½ inches

No way.

5/4 inches by 4 inches = 1 1/8 inches by 3 ½ inches

Mind. Blown… unless you’re a carpenter or in the construction industry.


In the United States, softwood lumber is governed by the American Softwood Lumber Standard which was developed by the American Lumber Standard Committee, in accordance with the Procedures for the Development of Voluntary Product Standards of the U.S. Department of Commerce. That’s a mouth full. However, the lumber standard is a government-approved codification of longstanding industry practices. And, while dimensional lumber is cut to a specific length, width, and depth, there is a difference between the nominal size (what the lumber is referred to) and its actual size.


Continue Reading

iStock_000003906886Large_books
© iStock

The Food Safety Modernization Act, which was signed into law by President Obama on January 4, 2011, promised sweeping reform of food safety practices from farm to fork, and shifted FDA’s regulatory posture from reacting to food contamination to proactively preventing it. While the Trump administration has vowed to eliminate two regulations for every new regulation, at this year’s Food and Drug Law Institute’s Annual meeting, Dr. Susan Mayne, the Director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, made clear that FSMA is the law of the land and FDA fully intends to continue its implementation and enforcement of it.


Continue Reading

On Friday, May 20, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a “refreshed” Nutrition Facts label, which, except for the addition of trans-fats in 2006, had gone largely untouched since 1994. Consumers will not only notice an updated design, which makes the label larger and bolder, but there are more substantive changes that, according to FDA, “are based on updated scientific information, new nutrition and public health research, more recent dietary recommendations from expert groups, and input from the public.”

Continue Reading

The FDA is cracking down on distributors of pure powdered caffeine. On Tuesday, the agency released a statement announcing that it fully intends to “aggressively monitor the marketplace for pure powdered caffeine products and take action as appropriate.” This is no empty threat. Warning letters were issued to five distributors of the product on August 27th. The FDA found the products to be adulterated within the meaning of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act because they contain amounts of caffeine that could be lethal to consumers, and require the use of a precise scale to distinguish a “safe serving from a potentially lethal amount.” As a result, the agency concluded that the products present “a significant or unreasonable risk of illness or injury under the conditions of use recommended or suggested in the labeling.”

Pure powdered caffeine products are 100% caffeine and a single teaspoon is the equivalent to approximately 25 cups of coffee.
Continue Reading

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released draft guidance on its mandatory recall authority; in doing so, FDA elaborated on its authority to issue user fees. Food retailers and manufacturers should take note that in the event FDA determines that there is: (1) a reasonable probability that a food product is misbranded

EPA has proposed a new rule to restrict the use of seven toluene diisocyanates (TDIs) in consumer products.  TDIs are commonly used in the production of polyurethanes found in foams, coatings, elastomers, adhesives and sealants used in consumer products.  Flexible foams (for cushioning) and rigid foams (for insulation) are the chief uses for TDI.

Published