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Evan Chuck is a partner in the firm’s Los Angeles office and is a member of the firm’s International Trade and Corporate Groups. He leads the firm’s Asia practice and is also a director of the firm’s China office in Shanghai.

Evan has more than 25 years of international trade and cross-border transactional experience. He has been a strategic advisor to Fortune 500 companies in structuring market entry, global supply chain and e-commerce strategies across the Asia-Pacific region. He has in-depth experience in China with cross-border acquisitions/dispositions, government regulatory compliance, and investigations. He advises major multinational companies on navigating the potential conflicts between and among U.S., E.U., and newly emerging Chinese law, including the Anti-foreign Sanctions Law, the PRC “Blocking Statute”, the PRC Export Control Law, Unreliable Entity List, the PRC Cybersecurity Law, and the PRC Data Security Law. He has also been representing a select group of large, multinational Chinese companies with complex U.S. transactional, tax, and regulatory issues. Evan works closely with the firm’s government affairs group and consulting group, Crowell & Moring International, to align global geo-political policy and strategy with cross-border legal advice.

A proposed law issued by the People’s Republic of China (PRC) on October 21, 2020, the draft Personal Information Protection Law, seeks to impose restrictions on entities and individuals, including those operating outside of China, that collect and process personal data and sensitive information on subjects in China. The proposed law also provides for penalties

For the first time in nearly two decades, China is revamping its export control regime and issuing its first unified Export Control Law, which combines concepts from more than a dozen existing Chinese laws and related regulations. This alert summarizes the most significant changes from current Chinese export control practice, highlights what may be

When selling and sourcing from China, companies should closely track any fapiaos issued from its Chinese subsidiaries and obtained from Chinese vendors, as missing, falsified, or fake fapiaos can carry significant potential civil and criminal penalties.

Anyone who has travelled to China will have encountered little pieces of paper called “fapiao” that act

As concern about coronavirus – the upper-respiratory infection that was first diagnosed in humans in Wuhan, China in late 2019, and has spread to the United States in recent days – grows worldwide, employers face a series of questions regarding the impact the virus will have on the workplace.

What Must Employers Do to Maintain