The news of Elon Musk’s $42-44 billion offer to purchase Twitter, and his apparent cold feet, have spread far and wide. Speculation has swirled that his offer was a politically-motivated stunt and that he never intended to actually follow-through with the deal. More recently, however, Musk has publicly demanded more information from Twitter regarding its so-called “bots” and he has publicly suggested that up to 20% of Twitter’s active user base is comprised of fake accounts, in contrast to the 5% that Twitter itself has claimed in its latest annual report. So, is Musk’s stated concern real or a coverup for cold feet?

While some have derided Musk’s demands as pretextual, he has a valid point that the number of real, daily active users on the Twitter platform – actual human eyeballs – is critical to the value of Twitter. A difference of 15% in estimates of bots is likely to be material. Twitter itself has said so.

Continue Reading Does Elon Musk Have a Point? The Impact of Bots on Twitter Revenue.

The FTC has placed Twitter in the hot seat again for privacy related practices that it alleges impacted over 140 million users. The Commission has also resolved actions pertaining to alleged magazine subscription scams and credit card laundering. In addition, the FTC is turning to the public to gather information regarding the recent infant formula shortage. These stories and more after the jump. 

Continue Reading FTC Updates (May 23–27, 2022)

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In today’s social media and internet focused world, tracking online reviews and commentary from consumers is essential for product manufacturers and retailers. Savvy online participation can provide companies with important quality feedback and bolster customer relations when consumer concerns are handled quickly and sensitively. But even companies are not