consumer product manufacturers

Lithium cell and battery manufacturers long have been required by the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) and international hazardous materials/dangerous goods transportation regulations to prove that lithium cells and batteries meet UN testing, specifically Sub-section 38.3 of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria. Last year, the U.S. DOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) issued a rule that will help each entity along the distribution chain easily know that the lithium cell or battery meets UN testing. (85 Fed. Reg. 27810 (May 11, 2020)).
Continue Reading Are You Ready for the U.S. DOT’s January 1, 2022 Deadline for Lithium Battery Test Summaries?

As the slow days of summer draw  to a close, school children are not the only ones facing a busy fall  workload. The U.S. Consumer Product  Safety Commission has a packed agenda this fall, and heading into 2015. Here are some of the issues consumer product manufacturers, distributors, and retailers should be following:

  1. 1110  Hearing: The CPSC hearing on September 18 was  scheduled as a result of significant comments filed on the proposed 110 rule in  order to review “stakeholders” anticipated challenges in meeting an electronic  filing requirement. It provides members  of the industry an opportunity to explain to the CPSC the practical logistics involved  in creating certificates that “accompany” products they ship globally. The announcement for the hearing signaled CPSC’s  desire to get into the details, such as understanding the difference between document  imaging and searchable data elements. Many companies have already developed  systems for meeting certificate of compliance requirements, and the rule  changes would necessitate reengineering of existing IT systems to meet new  requirements.
  2. Magnet  Rule: The Commission moved forward with a hearing  on the proposed rule to ban small rare earth magnets, despite concerns raised  by Commissioner Buerkle that the rulemaking was premature and could affect the  ability of the Commission to serve as the appellate review body with respect to  current administrative cases alleging the magnets present a substantial product  hazard. The matter is not set for a  ballot vote and a decisional meeting is scheduled for September 24, 2014.

    Continue Reading What’s Happening at CPSC This Fall