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On October 8, 2021, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) settled its charges against mattress company Resident Home LLC and its owner for allegedly making unsubstantiated claims that DreamCloud mattress’ are “proudly made with 100 percent USA-made premium quality materials.” In reality, the DreamCloud mattresses are finished abroad, and in some cases, they are completely imported or contain significant imported materials.
Continue Reading The FTC Settles “Made in USA” Case for $753,000 After New Rule Goes Into Effect

On December 18, 2020, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that “Oh, the Places You’ll Boldly Go!,” a Dr. Seuss and Star Trek mashup illustrated book, is not a fair use exempted from copyright liability. Under the Copyright Act of 1976, the factors courts assess in determining if there is fair use include:

  1. The

On November 30, 2020, New York Governor Cuomo signed into law a bill that will allow estates and representatives of deceased individuals to defend their names and likenesses from commercial exploitation, allowing their estates to continue to control and protect their likeness after their death. The new law, which establishes a “Right to Publicity” for deceased individuals who were domiciled in New York at their time of death, allows these individuals to that have commercial value, including their name, picture, voice, or signature, against unauthorized use.

In connection with the new post-mortem right to publicity, Governor Cuomo stated, “In the digital age, deceased individuals can often fall victim to bad actors that seek to capitalize on their death and profit off of their likeness after they pass away – that ends today. This legislation is an important step in protecting the rights of deceased individuals while creating a safer, fairer New York for decades to come.” The new post-mortem right of publicity applies up to 40 years after the death of the deceased personality, and it provides certain exceptions, such as for works of art or political interest, parodies and satires, and the use of names and likenesses in the news.

In enacting this law, New York joins the minority of U.S. states which recognize a post-mortem right of publicity, an area of law that has long been controversial and which has resulted in extensive discussion of choice-of-law rules.
Continue Reading ‘Imagine’ This: John Lennon Would Have Received Post-Mortem Right to Publicity in New York

Recently, New York enacted a new law against gendered pricing that was included as a key component of the state’s Fiscal Year 2021 budget and Governor Cuomo’s 2020 Women’s Agenda. In a press release announcing the law, Governor Cuomo states, “By abolishing the pink tax, women and girls will no longer be subject to harmful

On August 14, 2020, California Attorney General Becerra announced that the Office of Administrative Law approved final regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The approved regulations, which became effective immediately, guide businesses and consumers on the CCPA.  The final regulations can be found here.

Even before final approval of the regulations, the California Attorney General’s Office announced that it had already begun enforcing the CCPA in California. By July 10, 2020, the Office had issued warning notices to online businesses for failure to comply with the CCPA. The businesses receiving these notices will have 30 days to comply with the CCPA, or they risk a lawsuit being filed against them by the Attorney General’s Office. It is expected that in the future the AG will no longer issue warning letters and proceed with enforcement.Continue Reading California Attorney General Begins Enforcement of CCPA Even Ahead of Regulations’ Approval

Now that some businesses are attempting to re-open and must sanitize their locations for employees and the public, Attorneys General will vigilantly monitor for unsupported claims that products can cure or prevent the transmission of COVID-19. They will also watch for claims that a location using these products will be safe for the public.

The Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling in a trademark-infringement matter on April 23, 2020, holding that willfulness is not a necessary precondition to an award of profits. The unanimous ruling in Romag Fasteners, Inc. v. Fossil, Inc. ends years of uncertainty among the lower courts as to whether willfulness is a prerequisite to awarding